Mexican bread and other baked goods are the results of centuries of experimentation and the blending of influence from various European baking traditions.

The French influence in Mexican Bread is the strongest. From the bolillo evolving from a French baguette to the concha branching out from a French brioche even the terminology comes from France. A baño maría, meaning a water bath for a custard type budín or bread pudding comes from the French word bain marie. While the consumption of wheat has never surpassed that of corn in the country, wheat is still a staple food and an important part of everyday and special rituals. While Mexico has adopted various bread styles from Europe and the United States, most of the hundreds of varieties of bread made in the country were developed here.

However, there is little to no baking done in Mexican homes; instead, Mexicans have bought their baked goods from bakeries (and street vendors) since the colonial period.

Here are some of our favorites types perfect for a TORTA

Bolillo

A bolillo or pan francés is a type of savory bread traditionally made in Mexico, but also made in Central America. It is a variation of the baguette, but shorter in length and is often baked in a stone oven.

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Birote

Birote (pronounced bee-row-teh) is a crunchy, darkly baked sourdough bread said to have a flavor unique to the environment of Guadalajara.

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